18th Fighter Wing Association
Korean War Veterans - Pacific Guardians
Updated March 2017

18th PURSUIT GROUP

Officers from Left to Right:  Capt. Holloway, Adjutant; Capt. Bergguist, Operations; Maj. Walker, Commander; Capt. Ramey, Executive; Lt. Simpson, Personnel; Lt. Savoie, Supply and Engineering.
Capt. Holloway, Adjutant: General Bruce K. Holloway is commander in chief of the Strategic Air Command. SAC is the United States' long-range strike force comprised of a mixture of combat aircraft and intercontinental ballistic missiles. General Holloway's home is in Knoxville, Ten. He studied engineering for two years at the University of Tennessee before entering the U.S. Military Academy, where he graduated in 1937. After receiving his pilot wings at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas, in 1938, he served for two years with the Sixth Pursuit Squadron and 18th Pursuit Group in Hawaii before taking a postgraduate course in aeronautical engineering at the California Institute of Technology. Shortly after the United States entered World War II, he went to Chungking, China, to begin his combat experience as a fighter pilot with the famed "Flying Tigers" of the American Volunteer Group. Remaining with that group after it was activated as the Army Air Force's 23d Fighter Group, he became its commander before returning to the United States in 1944. During that tour in China, General Holloway earned status as a fighter ace, shooting down 13 Japanese planes. As commander of the Air Force's first jet-equipped fighter group in 1946, the general performed pioneer service in this new field of tactical jet air operations. Capt. Ramey, Exec. Off.: Lt. Gen. Roger Ramey in March 1939, he was transferred to Wheeler Field, HI to serve as Intelligence Officer of the 18th Pursuit Group (Interceptor). In June 1939, he was promoted to Captain and, in July, became Commanding Officer of the 19th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) at Wheeler Field. He was made Executive Officer of 18th Pursuit Group (Interceptor) in April 1940, also at Wheeler Field. Later that year, Ramey became Commanding Officer of the 42d Bombardment Squadron (Medium) at Hickam Field, HI and, in January 1941, was promoted to Major. On 7 December 1941, Ramey was Operations Officer of the 18th Bomb Wing at Hickam Field (Pearl Harbor) during the Japanese surprise attack. He was awarded a special commendation for his attempts to save our aircraft while Japanese planes strafed and bombed hangars, airplanes, and personnel. Shortly after the Pearl Harbor attack, Ramey was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and made Plans and Training Officer of 7th Bomber Command at Hickam. In March 1942, he was promoted to Colonel and made Acting Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Seventh Air Force, also at Hickam. Colonel Ramey became Commanding Officer of the 43rd Bombardment Group (Heavy) at Port Moresby, New Guinea in October 1942. The bombing attacks of the 43rd repelled the Japanese thrust at Port Moresby and brought about their expulsion from Papua, New Guinea. In early 1943, he became Chief of Staff of the 5th Bomber Command at Port Moresby and, in the Battle of Bismarck Sea in March, Ramey directed bombing attacks that resulted in a loss of 22 Japanese ships. .
Maj. Walker’s  Plane
(0-207.1-917-C-18) (2-8-40-10:20A) (12-150) P-36 Airplane in Flight, OAHU, T.H.
Updated December 2017
18th Fighter Wing Association
Korean War Veterans - Pacific Guardians

18th PURSUIT GROUP

Officers from Left to Right:  Capt. Holloway, Adjutant; Capt. Bergguist, Operations; Maj. Walker, Commander; Capt. Ramey, Executive; Lt. Simpson, Personnel; Lt. Savoie, Supply and Engineering.
Capt. Holloway, Adjutant: General Bruce K. Holloway is commander in chief of the Strategic Air Command. SAC is the United States' long-range strike force comprised of a mixture of combat aircraft and intercontinental ballistic missiles. General Holloway's home is in Knoxville, Ten. He studied engineering for two years at the University of Tennessee before entering the U.S. Military Academy, where he graduated in 1937. After receiving his pilot wings at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas, in 1938, he served for two years with the Sixth Pursuit Squadron and 18th Pursuit Group in Hawaii before taking a postgraduate course in aeronautical engineering at the California Institute of Technology. Shortly after the United States entered World War II, he went to Chungking, China, to begin his combat experience as a fighter pilot with the famed "Flying Tigers" of the American Volunteer Group. Remaining with that group after it was activated as the Army Air Force's 23d Fighter Group, he became its commander before returning to the United States in 1944. During that tour in China, General Holloway earned status as a fighter ace, shooting down 13 Japanese planes. As commander of the Air Force's first jet-equipped fighter group in 1946, the general performed pioneer service in this new field of tactical jet air operations. Capt. Ramey, Exec. Off.: Lt. Gen. Roger Ramey in March 1939, he was transferred to Wheeler Field, HI to serve as Intelligence Officer of the 18th Pursuit Group (Interceptor). In June 1939, he was promoted to Captain and, in July, became Commanding Officer of the 19th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) at Wheeler Field. He was made Executive Officer of 18th Pursuit Group  (Interceptor) in April 1940, also at Wheeler Field. Later that year, Ramey became Commanding Officer of the 42d Bombardment Squadron (Medium) at Hickam Field, HI and, in January 1941, was promoted to Major. On 7 December 1941, Ramey was Operations Officer of the 18th Bomb Wing at Hickam Field (Pearl Harbor) during the Japanese surprise attack. He was awarded a special commendation for his attempts to save our aircraft while Japanese planes strafed and bombed hangars, airplanes, and personnel. Shortly after the Pearl Harbor attack, Ramey was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and made Plans and Training Officer of 7th Bomber Command at Hickam. In March 1942, he was promoted to Colonel and made Acting Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Seventh Air Force, also at Hickam. Colonel Ramey became Commanding Officer of the 43rd Bombardment Group (Heavy) at Port Moresby, New Guinea in October 1942. The bombing attacks of the 43rd repelled the Japanese thrust at Port Moresby and brought about their expulsion from Papua, New Guinea. In early 1943, he became Chief of Staff of the 5th Bomber Command at Port Moresby and, in the Battle of Bismarck Sea in March, Ramey directed bombing attacks that resulted in a loss of 22 Japanese ships. .
Maj. Walker’s  Plane
(0-207.1-917-C-18) (2-8-40-10:20A) (12-150) P-36 Airplane in Flight, OAHU, T.H.