18th Fighter Wing Association
Korean War Veterans - Pacific Guardians
Updated March 2017

CAPTAIN HARRY C. MOORE

 February 11, 1924 - June 1, 1951

Missing in Action - Presumed Dead  

Harry Moore was born in Elm Grove, West Virginia on February 11, 1924.    He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in June of 1942 and was sent to Tyndell Field, Florida where he trained to be an aerial gunner.  In October 1942 he was sent to Barksdale Field, Louisiana and trained to be a radio operator.  He graduated as a radio operator with a rank of Staff Sergeant.  Harry was selected to enter pilot’s training and went to Coleman Flying School in Coleman, Texas.  Following graduation as a Second Lieutenant he was sent to Majors Army Air Field in Greenville, Texas for Basic Training in AT6 airplanes.  Upon successfully completing this training Harry went to Moore Field in Mission, Texas for advanced training as a fighter pilot on the P40 and other aircraft.  Harry graduated and received his wings as a fighter pilot.  He was transferred to the China-Burma-India Theatre where he flew P40 aircraft. Harry soon became a squadron leader and was subsequently shot down by the Japanese near Kunming, China.  He was listed as Missing in Action for fifty-one days.  On the fifty-first day his mother was notified that he had been Killed in Action.  That same day she received a telegram from Harry stating that he was alive and had rejoined his group. In September of 1948 he was sent to Hamilton Air Force Base in Marin County, California in preparation for his assignment in the Philippines. While there he married Lois at the base chapel at Hamilton Air Force Base.  After a few days Lois flew back to Elm Grove and Harry to the Philippines. In June of 1950 a “Police Action” had began between the United States and North Korea, the United States attempting to keep the north from taking over the south.  In July of 1950 Harry became a father and about ten days later was called to duty in Korea. The pilots were stationed in Japan and would do their bombing missions over Korea and then return to their base in Japan.  On June 1, 1951 while on a mission over the South China Sea he was struck by enemy fire and crashed into the water.  He was listed as Missing in Action.  On Dec. 31, 1953, the Air Force notified Lois that Capt. Harry Moore was presumed dead and was listed as killed in action. In 2002 Robert and Lois were notified that the Air Force had discovered in the Russian archives that Captain Moore was captured.  He was interrogated by Russian Col. Ivan Kosadub and then sent to Monino AFB 10 miles north of Moscow.  Our efforts for the past 14 years have not produced any additional information.  The DPAA is reluctant to admit that he was captured even though they supplied the particulars. On August 10, 2016, Captain Harry C. Moore was memorialised with a full military honors service at Arlington National Cemetery. Robert and Lois are continuing to search for information and force the government to admit that they left soldiers behind.  He was a true patriot.

All Gave Some - Some Gave All

Updated December 2017
18th Fighter Wing Association
Korean War Veterans - Pacific Guardians

All Gave Some - Some Gave All

CAPTAIN HARRY C. MOORE

 February 11, 1924 - June 1, 1951

Missing in Action - Presumed Dead  

Harry Moore was born in Elm Grove, West Virginia on February 11, 1924.    He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in June of 1942 and was sent to Tyndell Field, Florida where he trained to be an aerial gunner.  In October 1942 he was sent to Barksdale Field, Louisiana and trained to be a radio operator.  He graduated as a radio operator with a rank of Staff Sergeant.  Harry was selected to enter pilot’s training and went to Coleman Flying School in Coleman, Texas.  Following graduation as a Second Lieutenant he was sent to Majors Army Air Field in Greenville, Texas for Basic Training in AT6 airplanes.  Upon successfully completing this training Harry went to Moore Field in Mission, Texas for advanced training as a fighter pilot on the P40 and other aircraft.  Harry graduated and received his wings as a fighter pilot.  He was transferred to the China-Burma-India Theatre where he flew P40 aircraft. Harry soon became a squadron leader and was subsequently shot down by the Japanese near Kunming, China.  He was listed as Missing in Action for fifty-one days.  On the fifty-first day his mother was notified that he had been Killed in Action.  That same day she received a telegram from Harry stating that he was alive and had rejoined his group. In September of 1948 he was sent to Hamilton Air Force Base in Marin County, California in preparation for his assignment in the Philippines.  While there he married Lois at the base chapel at Hamilton Air Force Base.  After a few days Lois flew back to Elm Grove and Harry to the Philippines. In June of 1950 a “Police Action” had began between the United States and North Korea, the United States attempting to keep the north from taking over the south.  In July of 1950 Harry became a father and about ten days later was called to duty in Korea. The pilots were stationed in Japan and would do their bombing missions over Korea and then return to their base in Japan.  On June 1, 1951 while on a mission over the South China Sea he was struck by enemy fire and crashed into the water.  He was listed as Missing in Action.  On Dec. 31, 1953, the Air Force notified Lois that Capt. Harry Moore was presumed dead and was listed as killed in action. In 2002 Robert and Lois were notified that the Air Force had discovered in the Russian archives that Captain Moore was captured.  He was interrogated by Russian Col. Ivan Kosadub and then sent to Monino AFB 10 miles north of Moscow.  Our efforts for the past 14 years have not produced any additional information.  The DPAA is reluctant to admit that he was captured even though they supplied the particulars. On August 10, 2016, Captain Harry C. Moore was memorialised with a full military honors service at Arlington National Cemetery.  Robert and Lois are continuing to search for information and force the government to admit that they left soldiers behind.  He was a true patriot.