18th Fighter Wing Association
Korean War Veterans - Pacific Guardians
Updated March 2017

LT. COLONEL JULIAN CROW 

December 1917 – January 2016

 Former commander of 67th Fighter Squadron, 18th Fighter Bomber Wing
WWII - Korean War Veteran / Army Air Corps - US Air Force
Colonel. Crow joined the Army Air Corps in 1940. He attended basic training at Luke Airfield in Phoenix, Arizona and after graduation became a pilot training instructor.  After volunteering to serve in World War II he was transferred to Iceland to fly the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk,fighter aircraft. His assignment was to intercept German aircraft that flew out of Norway and destroy German submarines He separated from the Army Air Corps Reserves in 1947 and went to work with his brother. He truly missed flying and after a period of separation from the military he wrote a letter to the Pentagon and volunteered to go back into the service.
At the onset of the Korean War he volunteered to participate in the conflict. He was first assignment as an air inspector at the headquarters office in Seoul, but he wanted to fly. So, after speaking with the commander, the commander helped him get assigned to Chinhae (K-10) on the south  coast of Korea. When he got there he, being a Major, outranked the squadron commander, so they made him an executive officer. In the summer of 1952 Major Crow was transferred to 67th Fighter Squadron which operated out of Chinhae and Wonju airbases. There were about 25 pilots in the 67th and were equipped with P-51 Mustangs. Their ordnance consisted of 500 pound bombs, rockets, and napalm. The squadron targeted rail lines, bridges, convoys, trenches, anything that moved in North Korea. Since there were no hangars, it was tricky to maintain the P51’s in the freezing cold and in the hot summers of Korea. Major Crow said “mainly we wanted to get rid of bombs and get our tail out and home. To get above 10,000 feet, away from the enemy’s small arms fire”.  Major Crow was not required to fly missions with his men since he was a squadron commander but he insisted on flying with them. He flew 100 missions during the Korean War. Information provided by Susan Kee. Here's a link to the previous post that Susan Kee wrote about Lt. Col. Crow after she interviewed him in Seattle on January 12, 2016 Susan Kee’s interview with Col. Crow
Updated December 2017
18th Fighter Wing Association
Korean War Veterans - Pacific Guardians

LT. COLONEL JULIAN CROW 

December 1917 – January 2016

 Former commander of 67th Fighter Squadron, 18th Fighter Bomber Wing
WWII and Korean War Veteran / Army Air Corps - US Air Force
Colonel. Crow joined the Army Air Corps in 1940.  He attended basic training at Luke Airfield in Phoenix, Arizona and after graduation became a pilot training instructor.  After volunteering to serve in World War II he was transferred to Iceland to fly the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk fighter aircraft. His assignment was to intercept German aircraft that flew out of Norway and destroy German submarines He separated from the Army Air Corps Reserves in 1947 and went to work with his brother. He truly missed flying and after a period of separation from the military he wrote a letter to the Pentagon and volunteered to go back into the service. At the onset of the Korean War he volunteered to participate in the conflict. He was first assignment as an air inspector at the headquarters office in Seoul, but he wanted to fly. So, after speaking with the commander, the commander helped him get assigned to Chinhae (K-10) on the south coast of Korea. When he got there he, being a Major, outranked the squadron commander, so they made him an executive officer. In the summer of 1952 Major Crow was transferred to 67th Fighter Squadron which operated out of Chinhae and Wonju airbases. There were about 25 pilots in the 67th and were equipped with P-51 Mustangs. Their ordnance consisted of 500 pound bombs, rockets, and napalm. The squadron targeted rail lines, bridges, convoys, trenches, anything that moved in North Korea. Since there were no hangars, it was tricky to maintain the P51’s in the freezing cold and in the hot summers of Korea. Major Crow said “mainly we wanted to get rid of bombs and get our tail out and home. To get above 10,000 feet, away from the enemy’s small arms fire”.  Major Crow was not required to fly missions with his men since he was a squadron commander but he insisted on flying with them. He flew 100 missions during the Korean War. Information provided by Susan Kee. Here's a link to the previous post that Susan Kee wrote about Lt. Col. Crow after she interviewed him in Seattle on January 12, 2016.  Susan Kee’s interview with Col. Crow